Bill Summary for H 251 (2011-2012)

Summary date: 

Mar 8 2011

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2011-2012 Session
House Bill 251 (Public) Filed Tuesday, March 8, 2011
TO APPLY THROUGHOUT THE GENERAL STATUTES THE DEFINITION OF "DEVISEE" FOUND IN CHAPTER 28A OF THE GENERAL STATUTES RELATING TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF DECEDENTS' ESTATES AND TO DEFINE "DEVISE" CONSISTENTLY WITH THAT DEFINITION, TO MAKE THE USAGE OF THESE TERMS MORE UNIFORM THROUGHOUT THE GENERAL STATUTES, AND TO MAKE TECHNICAL CHANGES TO SECTIONS OF THE GENERAL STATUTES OTHERWISE AMENDED BY THIS ACT, AS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL STATUTES COMMISSION.
Intro. by Ross.

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Bill summary

Amends GS 12-3 (rules for statutory construction) to add the definitions for devisee and devise. Defines devisee as any person entitled to take real or personal property under the provisions of a valid, probated will. Defines devise, when used as a noun, as a testamentary disposition of real or personal property and, when used as a verb, to mean to dispose of real or personal property by will.
Removes the terms legatee and bequest and related language from various provisions of the General Statutes and replaces with devisee or devise where applicable. Authorizes the Revisor of Statutes to make conforming substitutions in the General Statutes as necessary.
Makes additional conforming and technical changes and makes language gender neutral.

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