Bill Summary for H 311 (2017-2018)

Summary date: 

Mar 9 2017

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2017-2018 Session
House Bill 311 (Public) Filed Thursday, March 9, 2017
AN ACT TO CLARIFY THAT THE OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR DOES NOT HAVE OVERSIGHT AUTHORITY OVER LICENSING BOARDS, TO CLARIFY THAT THE OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR IS NOT REQUIRED TO ADOPT UNNECESSARY RULES, TO REQUIRE A NON-STATE ENTITY THAT RECEIVES STATE FUNDS TO POST THE OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR'S HOTLINE, TO CLARIFY THAT THE PRODUCTION OF DOCUMENTS TO THE OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR DOES NOT WAIVE THE ATTORNEY CLIENT OR ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGES, AND TO ALLOW THE OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR TO DETERMINE THE LENGTH OF TIME THAT A STATE AGENCY MAY RESPOND TO AN AUDIT OF ECONOMY AND EFFICIENCY OR AN AUDIT OF PROGRAM RESULTS.
Intro. by Riddell, Cleveland, Adcock, Floyd.

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Bill summary

Amends GS 93B­4 to subject the books, records, and operations of each occupational licensing board to audit (was, oversight) by the State Auditor.

Amends GS 147­64.9 to require rules (was, rules and regulations) made and enforced by the Auditor to be reasonably necessary, as determined by the Auditor for the operation of the Auditor's office. Makes technical changes.

Amends GS 143C­6­23(g) to require non­state entities who are grantees or subgrantees of grant funds to conspicuously post in their offices the State Auditor's hotline telephone number, effective July 1, 2017.

Enacts new GS 147­64.7(d) to clarify that production of documents or information required under this statute for the State Auditor does not waive or impair attorney­client or attorney work product privileges.

Amends GS 147­64.6(c) to clarify that the window for an auditee's written response to an audit is a 15­ to 30­day window. Directs the Auditor to determine the length of time, commensurate with the number and complexity of the audit findings.

Except as otherwise indicated, the act is effective when it becomes law.

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