Bill Summary for S 219 (2021-2022)

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2021
Senate Bill 219 (Public) Filed Tuesday, March 9, 2021
AN ACT TO REVISE THE EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSURE OF A PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYOR, TO MAKE VARIOUS TECHNICAL CHANGES, TO CLARIFY THE DESIGN-BUILD AND DESIGN-BUILD BRIDGING STATUTES, TO PROHIBIT WAIVER OF FUTURE CLAIMS FOR PROGRESS PAYMENTS ON CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, AND TO REQUIRE ATTORNEYS' FEES IN CERTAIN LIEN CLAIMS.
Intro. by McInnis.

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Bill summary

Senate committee substitute amends the 1st edition as follows.

Further amends the education, experience and testing requirements of GS 89C-13(b) concerning licensure requirements for professional land surveyors, to revise the certification qualifications for land surveyor interns. Makes a clarifying change to require satisfaction of one of the three existing education or (was and) experience requirements set forth in subdivision (b)(1). Changes the second qualification to include holding an associate degree in surveying technology approved by the Board of Engineers and Surveyors (Board), three rather than four years of progressive practical experience under a practicing professional, and having passed a written and oral exam. Changes the third qualification to include graduation from high school or completion of an equivalency certificate, seven rather than ten years of progressive practical experience under a practicing licensee, and having passed a written and oral exam. Adds to the license requirements for professional land surveyors, providing for passing of the Fundamental of Surveying exam, the Principals and Practices of Land Surveying exam, and and additional written or oral exams required by the Board, as an alternative to meeting the existing qualifying education or experience requirements. 

Deletes the proposed changes to GS 89C-10 and instead amends the statute to more specifically deem the investigation of a nonlicensee to be confidential until the Board approves any action authorized under the Chapter against a nonlicensee. 

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