Bill Summary for H 645 (2019-2020)

Summary date: 

Jun 26 2019

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2019-2020 Session
House Bill 645 (Public) Filed Tuesday, April 9, 2019
AN ACT TO REVISE THE OUTDOOR ADVERTISING LAWS.
Intro. by Saine, Dixon, Jones, Wray.

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Bill summary

Senate committee substitute to the 4th edition makes the following changes.

Eliminates the proposed changes to GS 136-127, regarding state policy on outdoor advertising.

Eliminates the proposed changes to the definition of State law set forth in GS 136-128, and instead maintains the existing definition.

Modifies the requirements set forth in proposed GS 136-131.3 that must be met of outdoor advertising signs legally existing but that would not be conforming to customary use if relocated on the same sign location or site, to no longer prohibit the outdoor advertising sign from being converted to an automatic changeable facing sign when relocated on the same sign location or site. Establishes three new parameters for the relocation of an outdoor advertising sign: (1) prohibits a sign not located within a view corridor, as defined, prior to relocation from being relocated into a view corridor without municipal approval; (2) permits signs previously located within a view corridor to be relocated within the same view corridor; and (3) permits a sign relocated under subsection (a) to be relocated within a five-mile radius from the existing sign location if a municipality has established a view corridor, subject to the requirements of subsection (a) (concerning legally erected signs permitted to be relocated and reconstructed if located on property acquired by a public or private condemner who requires removal).

Modifies proposed GS 136-131.5 by eliminating the 30-day period given to the Department of Transportation to make a final determination on the relocation and reconstruction of an outdoor advertising sign proposed to be relocated to a site located five miles or less from the perimeter boundary of a military base.

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