Bill Summary for S 192 (2015-2016)

Summary date: 

Jul 15 2015

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2015-2016 Session
Senate Bill 192 (Public) Filed Thursday, March 5, 2015
AN ACT TO ALLOW DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PROTECTIVE ORDERS, CIVIL NO-CONTACT ORDERS, AND INVOLUNTARY COMMITMENT ORDERS TO BE TRANSMITTED BY ELECTRONIC AND FACSIMILE TRANSMISSION, TO AMEND LAWS REGARDING TRANSPORTATION OF PERSONS BEING INVOLUNTARILY COMMITTED, AND TO REQUIRE THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER OF THE COURTS TO RECEIVE INPUT ON CLARIFYING LANGUAGE USED IN CITATIONS AND MAKE CHANGES AS APPROPRIATE.
Intro. by Cook.

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Bill summary

House committee substitute makes the following changes to the 2nd edition.

Deletes all of the provisions of the previous edition and replaces it with the following. 

Amends GS 50B-3(c) and GS 50C-9(b) to require law enforcement agencies to accept copies of domestic violence protective and civil no-contact orders, issued by a clerk of court, by electronic or facsimile transmission for service on defendants.

Directs the Administrative Officer of the Courts, within 60 days of this act becoming law, to solicit input from clerks of court concerning the use of the term "costs" rather than "court costs" on motor vehicle law citation forms, with changes to be made as appropriate. Effective when the act becomes law, but not requiring the replacement of citation forms until new forms are otherwise needed. 

Amends GS 122C-251 to require a city or county to provide, to the extent feasible (was, required), transportation of a respondent in involuntary commitment proceedings by a driver or attendant who is the same sex as the respondent unless certain specified circumstances exist.

Enacts new GS 122C-210.3 to allow a custody order entered by the clerk or magistrate under GS Chapter 122C (the Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Act of 1985) to be delivered to the law enforcement officer by electronic or facsimile transmission.

Amends the long title.

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