Bill Summary for H 647 (2021-2022)

Summary date: 

Apr 22 2021

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2021
House Bill 647 (Public) Filed Thursday, April 22, 2021
AN ACT ALLOWING CERTAIN RETIRED LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS WHO ARE BENEFICIARIES OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM TO RETURN TO WORK AS SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS OR ELECTED SHERIFFS WITHOUT ADVERSELY IMPACTING THEIR RETIREMENT BENEFITS.
Intro. by McNeill, Potts.

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Bill summary

Amends GS 128-21 to add and define the term in-service retired law enforcement officer, defined as a beneficiary of the Local Governmental Employees' Retirement System (LGERS) who is (1) at least 59.5 years of age, with at least five years of creditable service as a law enforcement officer, and (2) is reemployed by a sheriff's office or a police department as a school resource officer in a capacity that meets the definition of employee under the Chapter, or is elected to the office of sheriff. 

Amends GS 128-24(5), which governs members whose LGERS membership is terminated and who becomes entitled to membership under the subdivision's provisions. Adds a new sub-subdivision providing that in-service retired law enforcement officers are not subject to the reemployment limitations specified in sub-subdivision c. Establishes that an employee who retired on an early or service retirement allowance and is restored to serve as an in-service retired law enforcement officer must have the employee's allowance continue for the duration of such employment, without limitation. Provides that the employee must again become a member of LGERS and contribute thereafter at the applicable, uniform contribution rate. Requires recomputation of the member's allowance in accordance with the service retirement provisions pertaining to law enforcement officers upon separation from service as an in-service retired law enforcement officer and upon written notification to the Board of Trusteed of the member's desire to retire, as specified. 

Effective July 1, 2021. 

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