Bill Summary for H 172 (2011-2012)

Summary date: 

Feb 23 2011

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2011-2012 Session
House Bill 172 (Public) Filed Wednesday, February 23, 2011
TO ENCOURAGE STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT TO USE MILITARY VETERAN CONTRACTORS.
Intro. by Killian.

View: All Summaries for BillTracking:

Bill summary

Amends GS 143-48 to add military veteran contractors to the state policy of encouraging and promoting the use of small contractors, minority contractors, physically handicapped contractors, and women contractors. Makes conforming changes to include data regarding military veteran contractors in the required annual reports under this statute. Enacts new GS 143-128.5 to set military veteran business (as defined) participation goal at 10% of the total value of work for each state building project and 10% for local government state appropriated building projects where the project cost is over $100,000. Requires cities, counties, and other public entities to set appropriate verifiable percentage goals for veteran businesses in building projects. Sets bidding and contract award requirements that require good faith efforts to reach these goals and to establish record keeping and reporting requirements (generally applicable to building projects with a total cost of $300,000 or more). Establishes reporting requirements. Defines military veteran as a citizen or lawful resident of the United States who (1) served in the U.S. Armed Forces or the NC National Guard for a minimum of 180 days but has since been discharged or released with an honorable discharge or a general discharge under honorable conditions, or (2) is or was a member of the reserve components of the Armed Forces as defined in 10 USC Section 10101, who was on active federal service status for 180 days or more. Adds provision to GS 143-131 requiring solicitation of military veteran participation in informal bids. Makes conforming changes. Effective when the act becomes law and applicable to bids solicited on or after that date.

© 2021 School of Government The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This work is copyrighted and subject to "fair use" as permitted by federal copyright law. No portion of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. Distribution by third parties is prohibited. Prohibited distribution includes, but is not limited to, posting, e-mailing, faxing, archiving in a public database, installing on intranets or servers, and redistributing via a computer network or in printed form. Unauthorized use or reproduction may result in legal action against the unauthorized user.

Printer-friendly: Click to view