Bill Summary for S 705 (2015-2016)

Summary date: 

Apr 1 2015

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2015-2016 Session
Senate Bill 705 (Public) Filed Thursday, March 26, 2015
AN ACT TO ENSURE A FAIR SALE OF THE DOROTHEA DIX PROPERTY; AND TO AMEND THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH FUNDS IN THE TRUST FUND FOR MENTAL HEALTH, DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES AND BRIDGE FUNDING NEEDS MAY BE USED.
Intro. by Pate, Tucker, Hise.

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Bill summary

Prohibits the Dorothea Dix Hospital campus from being disposed of unless the sale complies with this act or is otherwise authorized by the General Assembly subsequent to the enactment of this act. Specifies the sale procedure and sets the minimum acceptable bid for the Dorothea Dix Property at $52 million. Requires any sale to include a lease back to the state for 10 years of that portion of the Dorothea Dix Property that is necessary to house the operations of the Department of Health and Human Services. Requires the net proceeds of any sale pursuant to this act to be credited to the Trust Fund for Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services and Bridge Funding Needs (Trust Fund) and be spent only upon appropriation by the General Assembly and only for specified purposes. Voids a sale made pursuant to this act, or an agreement to sell under this act, unless at least 30 days prior to the effective date of the sale or agreement to sell the Joint Legislative Commission on Governmental Operations is consulted on the details of the sale or agreement.

Amends GS 143C-9-2 to allow moneys in the Trust Fund support programs and services that provide treatment alternatives for individuals residing, or at risk of residing, in the state's mental health, developmental disabilities, and substance abuse services institutions. 

Terminates the lease of the property to the City of Raleigh upon the effective date of this act. Requires any funds paid by the city under the lease to be refunded. Sets out the procedure under which the city can contest the adequacy of that compensation. 

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