Bill Summary for S 250 (2019-2020)

Summary date: 

Apr 3 2019

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2019-2020 Session
Senate Bill 250 (Public) Filed Wednesday, March 13, 2019
AN ACT TO CODIFY THE COMMON LAW REQUIREMENT FOR UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP TO QUALIFY AS A JUROR, TO ALLOW A CLERK OF COURT TO HEAR JURY EXCUSES IF SO DESIGNATED BY THE CHIEF DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, AND TO PROVIDE THAT THE NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF PERSONS REQUESTING TO BE EXCUSED FROM JURY DUTY BASED ON DISQUALIFICATION SHALL BE SHARED WITH THE STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS IF THE DISQUALIFICATION IS DUE TO UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP.
Intro. by Krawiec, Sanderson, Burgin.

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Bill summary

Senate committee substitute to the 1st edition makes the following changes.

Amends GS 9-6 and GS 9-6.1 to allow chief district court judges to delegate the authority to receive, hear, and pass applications for excuses from jury duty to the clerk of superior court, after consultation with and consent of the clerk. Makes technical and clarifying changes to the statutes, and makes language gender-neutral.

Amends proposed GS 9-6.2 to require the clerk of superior court to maintain records of excusals from jury duty, as previously specified, for the remainder of the biennium (was, for no less than two years from the date of excusal). Now requires the clerk to record the person's name, address provided, reason for disqualification, and the date of the disqualification if the person is disqualified from jury duty due to age, citizenship, residency, or criminal history (previously instead referenced reasons relating to qualifications under GS 163A-841). Requires the clerk to report the information electronically to the local board of elections and the State Board of Elections (was only the State Board of Elections and did not specify electronic records). Adds a new requirement for the State Board of Elections to retain the electronic record for two years. Adds a new provision to authorize the clerk to destroy the records at the end of each biennium. Adds a provision to clarify that the statute does not restrict the authority of a local board of elections or the State Board to determine a person's eligibility to vote.

Changes the act's long title.

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