Bill Summary for H 189 (2013-2014)

Summary date: 

Mar 18 2013

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2013-2014 Session
House Bill 189 (Public) Filed Thursday, February 28, 2013
A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT TO ALLOW DURHAM, ORANGE, FORSYTH, GUILFORD, MECKLENBURG, AND WAKE COUNTIES TO RETAIN A LOCAL SALES AND USE TAX CAP OF TWO AND THREE-QUARTERS PERCENT IF A MAJORITY OF VOTERS IN THOSE COUNTIES APPROVE THE LEVY OF A ONE-QUARTER PERCENT TAX IN A REFERENDUM HELD BY THE END OF 2016; TO EXPAND THE MAXIMUM GRANT ALLOWED FOR A TELEVISION OR VIDEO SERIES; TO CLARIFY THAT A FARMER'S INCOME FROM FARMING OPERATIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF THE SALES AND USE TAX EXEMPTION IS GROSS SALES AND ALL OTHER INCOME FROM FARMING OPERATIONS; AND TO MAKE OTHER TECHNICAL CHANGES TO THE REVENUE LAWS
Intro. by Glazier, Stevens, L. Hall.

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Bill summary

House committee substitute makes the following changes to the 1st edition.

Amends GS 110-136.3(a)(4a), providing that a non-IV-D child support order that contains an income withholding requirement and a IV-D child support order must require the NC Child Support Enforcement agency to provide, or to allow the obligor to obtain through the NC Child Support Centralized database, the current residence and mailing address of the custodial party, or the current residence and mailing address of the child, if the addresses are different. A form provided by the Administrative Office of the Courts will be supplied by the clerk of court to enable the obligor to proceed pro se pursuant to this subsection.

Establishes that there is no requirement that the court authorize the obligor to have access to the current residence and mailing address of the custodial party if the court has determined that providing the address to the obligor is inappropriate because of threats constituting domestic violence (previously, only provided a notice and not address).

Adds additional situations where the requirement to give access to the residence or address to the obligor is not required, including that the child is in foster care, protective custody, or a court-ordered placement, or disclosure of the address is otherwise prohibited by state or federal law.

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