Bill Summary for S 584 (2017-2018)

Summary date: 

Apr 4 2017

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2017-2018 Session
Senate Bill 584 (Public) Filed Tuesday, April 4, 2017
AN ACT TO DIRECT THE DIVISION OF ADULT CORRECTION TO DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A PILOT PROJECT TO ALLOW ADULT OFFENDERS AND JUVENILES WHO ARE IN GOOD STANDING TO HAVE ACCESS TO COMPUTER TABLETS FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION, BEHAVIORAL MODIFICATION, AND REHABILITATIVE PROGRAMMING IN PREPARATION FOR REENTRY INTO SOCIETY.
Intro. by McKissick, Bishop, Britt.

View: All Summaries for BillTracking:

Bill summary

Directs the Division of Adult Correction (Division) of the Department of Public Safety to establish and implement a pilot project to allow adult offenders and juveniles who (1) are on good behavior and (2) are within two years from their projected release date to have access to computer tablets. Provides that those eligible are to have access to computer tablets for the purposes of taking continuing education classes, vocational classes, parenting classes, domestic violence or anger management classes, and other programs approved by the Division. Establishes that the Division is to determine what databases are accessible from the tablets. Sets forth that the purpose of the project is to prevent recidivism by allowing adult offenders and juveniles to build educational credentials, participate in prerelease planning and preparations activities, build social support in the outside community, and expose adult offenders and juveniles to updated technology prior to release.

Directs the Division to select one or more State correctional institutions, youth development centers, and residential treatment facilities to implement the pilot project. Further directs the Division to use available funds to conduct the pilot project during the 2016-17 and 2017-18 fiscal years.

Directs the Division to report on the results of the pilot project to the 2019 Regular Session of the General Assembly upon its convening.

© 2021 School of Government The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This work is copyrighted and subject to "fair use" as permitted by federal copyright law. No portion of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. Distribution by third parties is prohibited. Prohibited distribution includes, but is not limited to, posting, e-mailing, faxing, archiving in a public database, installing on intranets or servers, and redistributing via a computer network or in printed form. Unauthorized use or reproduction may result in legal action against the unauthorized user.

Printer-friendly: Click to view