Bill Summaries: H 473 MILEAGE &AMP PER DIEM - STATE E'EES/LEGISLATORS.

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  • Summary date: Mar 26 2019 - More information

    Amends GS 138-6 by amending the reimbursement rates for travel by the officers and employees of State departments, institutions, and agencies, as follows. Sets the rate for transportation by privately owned automobile at the current business standard mileage rate set by the IRS per mile of travel and the actual cost of paid tolls. Sets the rate for a subsistence allowance for meals and lodging at a daily rate equal to the maximum per diem rate for federal employees traveling to Raleigh as set out by the General Services Administration in the current fiscal year. Requires the Director of the Budget, effective July 1, 2019, and annually thereafter to revise the amounts of payment of subsistence per day when traveling in-state and out-of-state equal to the maximum per diem rate for federal employees traveling to Raleigh as set out by the General Services Administration in the current fiscal year. Makes conforming deletions. Makes additional clarifying changes.

    Amends GS 120-3.1, effective upon the convening of the 2021 General Assembly, as follows. Requires that General Assembly members' weekly travel allowances be calculated by multiplying the actual round-trip mileage from the member's home to Raleigh by the rate per mile, which is the business standard mileage rate set by the IRS in Rev. Proc. 2010-51, December 14, 2018 (was, Rev. Proc. 93-51, December 27, 1993). Requires the travel allowance rate to be based on the same updated business standard mileage rate. Requires members' subsistence allowance for meals and lodging to be at a daily rate equal to the maximum per diem rate for federal employees traveling to Raleigh as set out at 83 Federal Register 42501 (August 22, 2018) (was, 58 Federal Register 67959, December 22, 1993). Makes conforming changes. 

    Except as otherwise indicated, applies to travel occurring on or after July 1, 2019.


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