Bill Summary for S 411 (2013-2014)

Summary date: 

Jun 4 2013
S.L. 2013-156

Bill Information:

View NCGA Bill Details2013-2014 Session
Senate Bill 411 (Public) Filed Monday, March 25, 2013
AN ACT TO PROVIDE THAT THE TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEES OF METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATIONS AND RURAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO STANDARD ETHICS PROVISIONS.
Intro. by Rabon, Harrington.

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Bill summary

House committee substitute to the 2nd edition makes the following changes. Amends the effective date provision as follows. Prohibits the State Ethics Commission from requiring  individuals serving on a metropolitan planning organization or rural transportation planning organization, who are not also members of the Board of Transportation, who have not yet complied with GS 138A-13 to complete ethics education as required by the statute, and the Commission may not apply Article 5 of GS Chapter 138A to those individuals (was, required individuals with voting authority serving on a metropolitan planning organization or a rural transportation planning organization to file statements of economic interest and additional real estate lists with the State Ethics Commission by April 15, 2013). Allows the State Ethics Commission to destroy the statement of economic interest forms filed by individuals under GS 136-202(e) and GS 136-211(e) and associated written evaluations if the filer does not have the authority to give final approval for actions of the metropolitan planning organization or rural transportation planning organization on which the filer serves and is not otherwise a covered person required to file a statement of economic interest (was, provided that members of a metropolitan planning organization or a rural transportation planning organization that filed a statement of economic interest under GS 136-202(e) or GS 136-211(e) are not required to file again, and required the State Ethics Commission to prepare the evaluation).

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